Day: November 10, 2020

The last soldier killed in WW I
Military Milestones

The last soldier killed in WW I

Becoming the last casualty of a war is a distinction no soldier wants, but in the First World War, it fell to a Canadian. Just minutes before the Armistice went into effect on Nov. 11, 1918, George Lawrence Price was shot, the last soldier of the British Commonwealth killed in the First World War. Price was born in Nova Scotia in December 1892, and as an adult he moved to Moose Jaw, Sask., where he toiled as a farm labourer. He was conscripted on Oct. 15, 1917, was sent to France in May 1918 and joined the 28th Battalion (Northwest) in June. He was 25 years old. In September, he spent time in hospital in France recovering from a gas attack during the Hundred Days Offensive. He was back in the line by the end of the month. On the last day of the First World War, two Canad...
Trip inspired Tomb of the Unknown Soldier
News

Trip inspired Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

Almost a quarter century ago, The Royal Canadian Legion spearheaded in the creation of the Canadian Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. The remains of an unidentified Canadian soldier of the First World War was reinterred with military honours at the National War Memorial in Ottawa on May 28, 2000, an event that would change the face of remembrance in Canada. In one of his first acts as dominion secretary of the Legion in 1996, retired brigadier-general Duane Daly attended a conference in South Africa. Daly, a Royal Canadian Air Force veteran, had never walked the hallowed ground of a Canadian battlefield cemetery. In South Africa, he visited several, and they were not what he expected. Immersing himself in the history of Canada’s role in the Boer War, Daly sought out Canadian military graves...
The fighting Robertson brothers of Campbellton, N.B.
Front Lines

The fighting Robertson brothers of Campbellton, N.B.

“The whole city was so proud of these six boys.” There were six of them, Robertsons all, who joined the Canadian forces, left their hometown of Campbellton, N.B., and sailed overseas to serve in the Second World War. Every one of the brothers survived the fighting, yet each died before his time, victims of more insidious killers than Axis bullets and bombs—namely, cancer and cardiopulmonary disease. None saw the age of 80. Born in 1910, Gerald was the oldest. He joined the army and served as a gunner during the Italian Campaign. Born 12 years after his oldest brother, Earl was still a teenager when he followed in his footsteps, joined the army and served as a gunner in Italy and the Netherlands. The others filled a variety of roles, although none joined the navy despite Campbel...