Day: November 6, 2020

Shipping out
Our Veterans, Remembrance

Shipping out

No matter what era, the moment when a soldier ships out is laden with bittersweet emotion—excitement, uncertainty, pride and trepidation For soldiers and those they leave behind, shipping out is all about goodbyes. Iconic photographs of wartime goodbyes the world over tend to focus on loved ones—family and friends massed dockside to bid farewell to waving soldiers swarming a ship’s deck; American soldiers and sailors, filled with bravado, kissing their girls on the steam-clouded platforms of New York’s Penn Station; troops milling about on a tarmac, waiting with stoicism to board a transport flight while family members wave from behind barriers. Mothers and fathers, wives and sweethearts, family and friends. Perhaps no goodbye is more wrenching than that of a son or daughter. Cana...
Service & Devotion
Remembrance

Service & Devotion

My father, Harry Culley, never talked much about the war, I think because he felt he got off easy compared to many others. He seemed to be embarrassed that he wasn’t a heroic pilot flying missions over enemy skies, or a gunner at the front facing the Germans. He served as a musician, occupying, in his opinion, a lower rung in the military hierarchy. Some of his fellow bandmates made self-deprecating comments about their status, such as Al Smith who said that he “fought Hitler with his French horn.” During the Depression years, Harry cobbled together part-time jobs to make a living. By day he was a bookkeeper at a smoke shop on Yonge Street in Toronto. By night he played saxophone and clarinet in downtown venues such as the Savarin Club and the Royal York Hotel. When the war started...
Sixth statue to be added to the Trail of the Caribou
News

Sixth statue to be added to the Trail of the Caribou

The government of Newfoundland and Labrador has awarded a contract to a local firm to build a sixth caribou statue to be placed in Gallipoli, Turkey, in order to complete the Trail of the Caribou. Innovation NL, an engineering and project-management company in St. John’s, will undertake the project, the government announced in partnership with the Royal Newfoundland Regiment Advisory Council and the College of the North Atlantic on July 29. The estimated value of the contract is $194,000. The new statue is to be placed 25 metres northwest of the Hill 10 Cemetery at Gallipoli, a Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemetery where 12 members of the Newfoundland Regiment are buried. Among them is Private Hugh McWhirter, the first Newfoundlander killed in the First World War. By the time the...

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