Day: March 11, 2020

Navy considers replacing ‘seaman’ ranks with gender-neutral terms
Front Lines

Navy considers replacing ‘seaman’ ranks with gender-neutral terms

Looking to recruit more women—or anyone, for that matter—the Royal Canadian Navy is switching to gender-neutral terms for its junior ranks. The ranks master seaman, leading seaman, able seaman and ordinary seaman will be scrapped and likely replaced by equivalent ‘hands’ or ‘rates,’ depending on the outcome of discussions and an informal survey launched by the navy. Lieutenant (Navy) Jamie Bresolin, a Department of National Defence spokesman, told True North Magazine that naval leadership decided to change the ranks to reflect the more progressive character of the force. “The RCN, one of Canada’s top employers in 2019 according to Forbes, prides itself on inculcating an inclusive, diverse, gender-neutral and safe workplace,” said Bresolin. “Therefore, it was recently determined ...
Fighting in the Rhineland
Military Milestones

Fighting in the Rhineland

First Canadian Army saw its first combat on German soil during the Second World War at the Battle of the Rhineland between Feb. 8 and March 11, 1945. And bloody it was. The Germans were heavily armed, well supplied and fanatical, dug in behind a network of trenches and machine-gun nests in three defensive lines, including the Siegfried Line, built in the 1930s through the Reichswald Forest, and another line of fortifications through the Hochwald Forest. They had been ordered by Adolf Hitler personally not to give up German soil. The Allied plan was to encircle German forces in the Rhineland, an area between the Roer and Rhine rivers, in a pincer movement. American forces were to attack from the south, Canadian and British from the north. But it didn’t go entirely as planned. The G...

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