Month: March 2020

U.S. army research gives new meaning to G.I. ‘Joe’
Front Lines

U.S. army research gives new meaning to G.I. ‘Joe’

Ah, caffeine. That little pause that refreshes. But if you’re in the military, that cuppa joe or caffeine-laced energy drink can literally be a lifesaver. That’s why scientists in the United States military have spent 10 years researching the benefits of caffeine. They’ve come up with a mobile application called 2B-Alert, which can recommend how much of the popular stimulant to consume and when to consume it to optimize its effects. “Mathematical models that accurately predict the effects of sleep/wake schedules on human neurobehavioral performance are valuable tools for effective management of operational alertness and fatigue,” says the study, first published in the journal Sleep in 2016. “However, to be of practical use, they must also be able to predict the alertness- and ...
Skirmish at Duck Lake
Military Milestones

Skirmish at Duck Lake

The Northwest Rebellion—or Northwest Resistance, depending on which side of history you are on—began on March 26, 1885, in Saskatchewan near the junction of two trails, one of which led to Batoche and the other to Fort Carlton. The buffalo were disappearing, the government had stinted on promised treaty payments and on food rations, leaving many Prairie First Nations on the brink of starvation. The Métis worried about recognition of their right to own land in the face of government land promises to the railways, an influx of settlers and government surveyors moving in to reshape long, narrow Métis river lots to conform to the township system’s square shapes. Decisions that affected their fates were being made thousands of kilometres away, without First Nation or Métis input and by pe...
New ships raise issue of missile defence
Eye On Defence

New ships raise issue of missile defence

When it comes to Canadian defence policy, there is something poison about the words “missile defence.” The United States attempted to get Ottawa to sign on to its missile-defence program as far back as 2005 when then-prime minister Paul Martin turned the U.S. away after several months of a rancorous debate in Canada. The government of Stephen Harper, which followed, never publicly attempted to join the U.S. missile-defence program. The current government of Justin Trudeau decided not to join the program when the U.S. again attempted to enlist Canada in 2017. Now the question of whether Canada will join the U.S.—and other NATO partners—in mounting a missile-defence program is becoming more pressing as Irving Shipbuilding Inc. in Halifax prepares for the construction of 15 new Canadian S...
What would you do?
Pilgrimages

What would you do?

I take a breath, scoot to the edge of my seat—ready to exit the van and eager to investigate our next stop. I walk along Ruytershoveweg Road toward a tall white wall, set back from the street and seemingly out of place among the trees that surround it. The beautiful clean lines and balanced shape appeal to me; I like the contrast of white against the green forest backdrop. It is peaceful here on the outskirts of Bergen op Zoom, Netherlands, on this October day and I am aware of the crunch of gravel and fallen leaves as I approach. I stand dead centre at the entrance to the Dilemma Maze, an interactive art installation, as our guide, Peter Stoop, asks the question, “What would you do?” Located beside the Bergen-op-Zoom Canadian War Cemetery, this dynamic maze consists of a pattern of c...
Choose our cover for the May/June issue of <em> Legion Magazine! </em>
News

Choose our cover for the May/June issue of Legion Magazine!

– CLICK ON PHOTO TO ENLARGE – The May/June 2020 issue of Legion Magazine will commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Liberation of the Netherlands and Victory in Europe and we want our dedicated readers to be a part of it. Help choose our cover! Cast your vote, give us your opinion and share with your friends on social media! VOTE BELOW! Loading…
The evolution of war photography
Front Lines

The evolution of war photography

In an age when technology limited most photography to static studio poses and bland, if not severe, countenances, Canadian army photographer William Rider-Rider elevated the art to a higher level under the most trying of circumstances. Armed with a bulky 4x5 box camera, the lieutenant from London, England, captured striking images of Canadian soldiers in the trenches and among the ruins of First World War Europe. The locales, the faces and the circumstances humanize the history behind the photographs, bringing it to life as few did. A press photographer who joined the Daily Mirror in 1910, Rider-Rider took the torch passed to him by Crimean War photographer Richard Fenton and the U.S. Civil War’s Mathew Brady before him, and carried it forward to a new generation that would emerge du...

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