The Grey Cup in Lahore

November 27, 2019 by Sharon Adams

Head coach Bud Grant sips from the Grey Cup in celebration of the victory over the Hamilton Tiger-Cats on Nov.27, 1965.
CFL Alumni
In late November 1965, Canadian peacekeepers at an air base in Lahore, Pakistan, received an early Christmas present—a film recording of the Grey Cup game.

Nearly 100 Canadians had been deployed on a United Nations mission supervising a ceasefire between warring India and Pakistan in the fall of 1965. The Canadians provided air transport and reconnaissance with three RCAF Otters and three Caribous. They were led by Major-General B.F. Macdonald and located at a base along the India-Pakistan border between Lahore and Amritsar, India.

Aside from aerial reconnaissance, the Otters regularly flew between Rawalpindi and New Delhi. But the extremely hot weather caused problems. The Otters could only fly three hours a day, as they burned seven and a half litres of oil an hour. Drums of oil were cached in the desert for refuelling.

A program from the 1965 Grey Cup game in Toronto.
CFL Alumni
India and Pakistan fought to a standoff, each losing 3,000 or more soldiers in battle, and each capturing some of the other’s territory. Once withdrawal terms were finalized, peacekeepers supervised troop withdrawal.

It was hot and dirty work, so a reminder of home, and crisp weather, was welcome.

The 53rd Grey Cup, known as the Wind Bowl, was played in Toronto on Nov. 27, 1965, plagued by intermittent snow flurries and wind gusts topping 50 kilometres per hour. The Hamilton Tiger-Cats defeated the Winnipeg Blue Bombers 22-16, all points scored when the offensive team was going with the wind. This year, the Blue Bombers and the Tiger-Cats were again contesting the Grey Cup but this time the Blue Bombers won.

  • stevie 1950

    Very inspiring the Canadian troops wanted and appreciated the film of the Canadian 1965 Grey Cup, but more of the story would have been appreciated by me.

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