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Day: September 25, 2019

The costs of war (Part 2): Military greenhouse gas emissions
Front Lines

The costs of war (Part 2): Military greenhouse gas emissions

A series of reports produced by the Costs of War Project says the American military is contributing significantly to climate change, emitting more greenhouse gases than some developed countries and compromising national security in the process. The United States Department of Defense is “the world’s largest institutional user of petroleum and correspondingly, the single largest producer of greenhouse gases in the world,” according to Pentagon Fuel Use, Climate Change and the Costs of War, a report by Neta C. Crawford, a co-director of the project, based at Brown University’s Watson Institute. The report estimates U.S. military greenhouse gas emissions exceeded 1.2 billion tonnes between 2001, when the war on terror began, and 2017. In 2017 alone, the Pentagon’s greenhouse gas emissio...
BOMARC missiles come to Canada
Military Milestones

BOMARC missiles come to Canada

In 1957, the United States and Canada signed the North American Air Defence Agreement to place their air forces under joint command to facilitate defence of the entire continent from Soviet nuclear bombers. On Sept. 23, 1958, Prime Minister John Diefenbaker announced that under that agreement, two Royal Canadian Air Force squadrons were to be equipped with surface-to-air guided BOMARC anti-aircraft missiles. But the prime minister failed to inform Canadians that the BOMARC missiles would have nuclear warheads. When the news broke in 1960, the country was plunged into a contentious military and moral debate. Diefenbaker’s own cabinet was split on the issue, and anti-nuclear protests were held throughout the country. Should Canada live up to its Norad obligations, or stand up in ...

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