Month: March 2019

I’ve got your back
Front Lines

I’ve got your back

There is an adage that is embraced by all the military, but especially the infantry: I’ve got your back. It’s fundamental to any successful endeavour against an enemy in battle. But who’s got your back when the battlefield is life and the enemy is yourself? “I think it’s even more significant now than when I was in the military,” says Helene LeScelleur, a former captain in 5 Field Ambulance who lost her military career to post-traumatic stress disorder. “The military community is very strong; the brotherhood is very strong. But the brotherhood within the wounded community is even stronger.” Mutual support and endurance were common threads among the 27 wounded veterans of Afghanistan I interviewed and photographed for the Legion Magazine series The Wounded, which is ...
Chasing <em> U-744 </em>
Military Milestones

Chasing U-744

It was a fat target for German U-boats: close to five dozen cargo ships laden with explosives, fuel and lumber for the war effort and life-sustaining food—grain, sugar, meat and frozen foods—which left Halifax on Feb. 22, 1944, bound for wartorn Britain. Escorting the convoy were HMS Icarus, a destroyer, HMCS St. Catharines and four corvettes HMC ships Chaudière, Gatineau, Chilliwack and St. Fennel. They were about to take part in the second longest U-boat hunt of the Second World War. Gatineau’s asdic (sonar) detected a U-boat on March 5. Immediately, the escorts, joined by British corvette HMS Kenilworth Castle, began to attack. U-744, commanded by Oberleutnant zur See Heinz Blischke, dove deep, manoeuvring to escape his attackers through that night and the next day. “I was on d...
Schooling soldiers
Editorial

Schooling soldiers

Canada, military service and education go hand-in-hand. Every phase of a soldier’s training represents some form of education, of course. But that training is designed to build a successful army. What about preparing soldiers to succeed as civilians? In 1916, Canadian soldiers fighting at the front and training in England began to ask for educational support in anticipation of postwar life. As demand grew, a government-funded initiative, called the Khaki University of Canada, was started (see page 28). By the end, tens of thousands of Canadian veterans came home with newfound skills and knowledge, in addition to what they learned about warfare. Following the Second World War, with financial aid from the Veterans Rehabilitation Act, 54,000 veterans went to university. In the 1970s, the ...
Free representation available to veterans
Serving You

Free representation available to veterans

Did you know service officers care and can help you, and it will cost you nothing? Yes, that is true, free of charge. The Royal Canadian Legion’s Veterans Services Network service officers can assist and represent still-serving Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) members, veterans, RCMP members and their families regarding disability claims or related issues with Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) and the Veterans Review and Appeal Board (VRAB). We provide free professional counselling and representation services at all levels of the disability claim process under the Pension Act or the Veterans Well-being Act. Our professional Legion command service officers provide these services free of charge, whether or not you are a member of the Legion. Our representation role is mandated through legislation...
Heroes and Villains: Doherty and Booth
Heroes And Villains

Heroes and Villains: Doherty and Booth

Born to Irish immigrants in Wickham, Canada East, on Sept. 26, 1838, Edward P. Doherty moved to New York City in 1860. When the American Civil War erupted the following April, he immediately enlisted in the Union Army as a private. Captured at the First Battle of Bull Run, Doherty managed a daring escape and by war’s end he was a first lieutenant with the 16th New York Cavalry, a unit charged with defending Washington. Ten days after President Abraham Lincoln’s assassination on Good Friday, April 14, 1865—acting on information that assassin John Wilkes Booth and accomplice David E. Herold were somewhere between the Potomac and Rappahannock rivers—Doherty was sent to apprehend them. With 25 soldiers under his command and accompanied by two detectives, Doherty had little success until a f...
March/April 2019 issue – Now Available!
News

March/April 2019 issue – Now Available!

The March/April 2019 issue of Legion Magazine is out today! Look for it on newsstands or check your mailbox if you subscribe already. LIFE ON THE LINE What they wore, said and ate at the front in the Second World War CLASS OF 1918 Soldiers fighting overseas wanted schooling for postwar life and Canada’s Khaki University educated thousands BIONIC ARMS Artificial limbs that perform like the real thing are moving from the realm of science fiction into real life VINTAGE WARBIRDS Ah, how they sing and soar among the clouds FACE TO FACE Is the Spitfire the most elegant aircraft ever built? DUTCH GRATITUDE Holland’s appreciation of Canada abounds as the 75th anniversary of the liberation of the Netherlands approaches SONGS FROM THE PATRIOTIC HEART...

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