NEW! Canadian Military History Trivia Challenge

Day: August 16, 2017

11 iconic weapons of the Second World War
enLISTED, Uncategorized

11 iconic weapons of the Second World War

M1 Garand rifle   The M1 Garand was the standard U.S. service rifle during the Second World War and the Korean War and saw limited use during the Vietnam War. Named for its Canadian-born designer John Garand, the weapon was the first standard-issue semi-automatic military rifle; replacing the bolt-action M1903 Springfield rifle. The .30 caliber gas-operated rifle weighs around 9.5 pounds and is just over a metre long. It has an eight-round clip which ejects from the rifle when empty, creating a distinctive metallic “pinging” sound. Roughly 5.4 million of these rifles were made during the Second World War and were used by all branches of the United States military.   M1 Carbine rifle   Often mistaken for a shorter version of the M1 Garand, the M1 Carbine...
Army tents for refugees
Front Lines

Army tents for refugees

While Haitian and other refugees flee the United States in fear of its new government policies on immigration, Canadians do what Canadians do best: they help. Canadian soldiers were out last week erecting a tent village near the U.S. border to accommodate waves of asylum seekers crossing into Quebec. The Department of National Defence says the camp in Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, Que., can house up to 500 people. The “modular tent shelters” have floors, lighting and heat. “Setting up tents—this is something, obviously, we’re quite familiar with. We’re pretty good at doing this,” Major Yves Desbiens told the CBC. Before anyone complains that this shouldn’t be the job of our fighting forces—remember, these are the same forces who were summoned to Toronto to shovel snow in 1999. Afte...
New building gives branch new life
News

New building gives branch new life

The Royal Canadian Legion’s North Calgary Branch has a new building, three new revenue streams and a steady influx of new members—and it hasn’t cost a cent. This happy turn of events took root six years ago when the branch recognized that, like many urban Legions, it was cash-poor and asset-rich. Its 50-year-old building, sitting on an oversized plot of prime urban real estate, was falling apart and underutilized. The roof was leaking, the sewers were backing up and the membership rolls, which peaked at 5,000 in the 1970s, were depleted. The branch decided to make a trade: swap two-thirds of the property with a developer in exchange for a new building. But not just any new building. This has a restaurant open to the public on the first floor—the 1918 Tap and Table, its name a coincide...

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