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Day: August 15, 2017

Blustering on air
Humour Hunt

Blustering on air

Illustration by Malcolm Jones In direct competition with the most popular afternoon soaps, it debuted in October 1977 to modest reviews and small audiences. Yet somehow, nearly 40 years later, “Question Period,” live from the House of Commons, is still on the air. The cast has changed completely over the years, but the rhetorical battles over many of the same issues continue. Having watched the parliamentary proceedings through most of their impressive run on our airwaves, sometimes professionally while working on Parliament Hill, other times recreationally (yes, I know, it is a little sad), I consider myself something of an expert on the daily spectacle. There have been moments of high drama—I just can’t think of any right now—sprinkled in among hours of stultifyingly boring debate ...
John A. Macdonald’s rocky road to Confederation
O Canada

John A. Macdonald’s rocky road to Confederation

In 1864, John A. Macdonald, along with George Brown, D’Arcy McGee and Alexander Galt, sailed to Charlottetown to convince the maritime colonies to join Confederation. On board was $13,000 worth of champagne to smooth negotiations. “Whether as a result of our eloquence or the goodness of our champagne,” wrote Brown, “the ice became completely broken…thereupon the union was completed and proclaimed.” However, there were still a few details to be worked out. The party moved to Halifax, Saint John, Fredericton, and finally, Quebec, where there was a dinner at Government House. A daughter of one of the delegates described the scene: “D’Arcy McGee took me to dinner and sat between Lady MacDonnell [wife of the Governor of Nova Scotia, Sir Richard MacDonnell] and I. Before dinner was half ove...

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