Month: August 2017

41st RCL National Track and Field Championships in pictures
News

41st RCL National Track and Field Championships in pictures

Story and photography by Stephen J. Thorne Almost 650 athletes, nearly 100 coaches and hundreds of volunteers gathered under the Prairie sun at Brandon’s brand-new athletics facility Aug. 11-13 for the 41st Royal Canadian Legion National Track and Field Championships. It is the only meet of its kind for under-18s and under-16s in Canada, the go-to event for aspiring young stars. Over the years, the Legion meet has attracted the likes of Olympians Angela Bailey, Melisa Bishop, Angela Chalmers, Chamaine Crooks and Robert Esmie, to name just a few. This year, 10 meet records were broken, including four national age-group records. Here is a look at some of the action, the winners, and the promising talent over three days of competition. Be sure to subscribe to Legion Magazine ...
4 novels where the Axis won the Second World War
enLISTED, Uncategorized

4 novels where the Axis won the Second World War

Fatherland by Robert Harris   Set in 1964, this alternate-history spy thriller takes place in a world where Nazi Germany launches a massive U-boat attack that eventually leads to British surrender. Meanwhile, the United States continues to defeat Imperial Japan by use of atomic bombs. The threat of mutually assured destruction leads to a peace treaty between the United States and Germany, with these two competing superpowers then finding themselves in a Cold War-type scenario two decades later. The novel follows Xavier March, a former German SS detective investigating a plot to cover up the events of the Holocaust (which most of the world is unaware of). In the hope of improving relations with the United States, March begins eliminating high-ranking Nazi officials. ...
Sword rattling won’t change Canada’s defence policy
Front Lines

Sword rattling won’t change Canada’s defence policy

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau sent a message that Canada will not be browbeaten when he reasserted his position Aug. 23 that the country will act in its own best interests on the issues of troops for Afghanistan and continental missile defence. U.S. President Donald Trump announced last week that he would boost troop levels and extend American involvement in the ongoing struggle against Taliban and ISIS in Afghanistan, though he offered no specifics. “We will ask our NATO allies and global partners to support our new strategy, with additional troop and funding increases in line with our own,” Trump said. “We are confident they will.” Not Canada, however. Trudeau reiterated his assertion, made earlier this spring, that the government has no plans to revive Canada’s mission in Afgh...
Contest winner travels to Ottawa for Canada’s biggest party ever
News

Contest winner travels to Ottawa for Canada’s biggest party ever

It was the biggest party of the year, and Barron McKay of Cache Creek, B.C., was the lucky winner of Legion Magazine’s contest to celebrate Canada’s 150th birthday in the nation’s capital. Sponsored by Carlson Wagonlit Travel, the four-day visit included round-trip airfare and three-night accommodation in the heart of downtown Ottawa. Accompanying McKay on the trip was his wife, Carol, and sister-in-law Diane. After arriving in Ottawa on June 30, they started with a tour of the Canada Aviation and Space Museum. McKay, a self-proclaimed aviation buff, was eager to see the museum’s display on the Avro Arrow. Canada Day in the capital proved to be as exciting as promised. Rain threatened to disrupt the celebrations, but the first-time visitors refused to let it keep them from joining th...
The soulless gaze of haters
Front Lines

The soulless gaze of haters

Back in 1994, I spent a month in South Africa writing features for The Canadian Press (CP) during the campaign leading to the country’s first democratic elections. I saw South Africa from every perspective I could—black, white, Coloured. I regularly visited and ate in the home of my fixer Noah Makone in Soweto and talked at length with his friends and neighbours about life under apartheid and their hopes for the future. I drove those same neighbourhoods on patrol with a white, two-man unit of the dreaded South African Police, their pistols stuffed between their legs and the capped box of their white Toyota pickup truck crammed with weapons of every description. It was a very different perspective, and experience. At one point, we found ourselves in the middle of a race riot. Th...
The club no one hopes to join
Artifacts

The club no one hopes to join

  Fighter pilot Captain Brian Bews was rehearsing for an air show in Lethbridge, Alta., on July 24, 2010, when one engine of his CF-18 Hornet died. He ejected only 90 metres from the ground; two seconds later, his jet was a fireball and he was floating to earth. Bews had just become eligible for the Caterpillar Club, an exclusive group no one really wants to join: those who survived by parachuting from an aircraft that crashed. No one knows exactly how many people have been saved by parachutes, though just one manufacturer—the Irvin Air Chute Company (later Irvin Aerospace, now Airborne Systems)—has rescued more than 100,000. First World War parachutes were scarce and were inconveniently stored aboard observation balloons and aircraft. Tailor Franz Reichelt invented the w...

Sign up today for a FREE download of Canada’s War Stories

Free e-book

An informative primer on Canada’s crucial role in the Normandy landing, June 6, 1944.