Month: June 2017

Canada at 150
Canada Corner, O Canada

Canada at 150

Canada was formed by a combination of hope and fear; hope that something great could be created in the wilderness, and fear of American imperialism and Fenian raiders. At 150, we are no longer young, but compared to our aging parents (England is 1,146 years old, if you count Alfred the Great as its first king, France a creaky 1,531), we remain youthful. When we look back at our shared mythologies—the people, politics and events that made Canada, we see heroism, occasional chaos and the overcoming of long odds, starting with Confederation. Confederation brought together four men who were divided by religious, political, linguistic and regional animosities. John A. Macdonald dominated Upper Canadian politics, a Conservative Scot who distrusted the English and was often drunk. George B...
Masters of their fate, part 2
Invictus Games

Masters of their fate, part 2

Team Canada’s training camp in Kingston, Ont., set the roster for the Invictus Games in Toronto this September Story and photography by Stephen J. Thorne Canada announced its Invictus Games team on June 15, as a second week-long training camp wrapped up in Kingston, Ont. The photos below were taken there as the athletes trained. The Games were created by Prince Harry in 2014 to honour and help the wounded through the power of rehabilitative sports. “Invictus” means “unconquered,” and the spirit of the competition is captured in the words of the 1875 poem “Invictus” by William Ernest Henley: “I am the master of my fate: I am the captain of my soul.” Ninety veterans and serving members with physical or mental-health injuries, wounds or illnesses contracted while with the...
11 memorials to unknown soldiers from around the world
Blog, enLISTED

11 memorials to unknown soldiers from around the world

  Most Canadians are familiar with the Tomb of the Unknown Solider, at the base of the National War Memorial in Ottawa. However, some might not know that the tradition of burying the unidentifiable remains of a soldier to honour all those who sacrificed their lives fighting for their country is common all around the globe. Here are a few examples of the monuments from other countries.   Canada   Belgium   Brazil   France   India   Italy   Japan   Russia   Serbia   United Kingdom   United States  
Considering the rigours of military life
Front Lines

Considering the rigours of military life

The chief of the defence staff says the Canadian military needs to make more effort to ensure its members have the right stuff to endure the challenges of military life. Speaking to the House of Commons Standing Committee on National Defence, General Jonathan Vance described plans to fundamentally change the military’s health-and-wellness regime to better secure the overall well-being of soldiers, sailors and aircrew and guarantee those who are sick and injured every opportunity to remain productive contributors. But, while stating that barriers to care must be removed, Vance said change has to start with the very basics of who the military recruits and how it trains and prepares them for the life they are going to lead. “We need to work on resilience,” the chief told MPs on J...
Masters of their fate
Invictus Games

Masters of their fate

Team Canada’s training camp in Kingston, Ont., set the roster for the Invictus Games in Toronto this September Story and photography by Stephen J. Thorne Canada announced its Invictus Games team on June 15, while its second week-long training camp wrapped up in Kingston, Ont. The photos below were taken there as the athletes trained. Ninety veterans and serving members with physical or mental-health injuries, wounds or illnesses contracted while with the Canadian Armed Forces were chosen. Sponsored by the military’s Soldier On program, the team is supported by 11 coaches, two athletic trainers, a medical team, a manager and staff. They will compete in 12 adaptive sports at the Games slated for Toronto in September, facing some 500 athletes from 17 allied countries at this, the...
Spending two per cent of GDP is misleading
Front Lines

Spending two per cent of GDP is misleading

  It constitutes a small part of the government’s recently released defence policy review, but it’s a telling one. Just 579 of 8,805 words are devoted to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s two-per-cent-of-GDP standard for defence spending, but the words and the numbers suggest Ottawa will likely never meet the alliance’s ideal. The much-anticipated policy document, a year in the making, lays out the Liberal government’s plans to rebuild and renew Canada’s military over the coming decades, promising $62.3 billion in new military spending over 20 years. That would bring the annual defence budget to $32.7 billion in 2026-27 from $18.9 billion this fiscal year. Even then, however, forecasted expenditures will comprise only 1.4 per cent of GDP, up from a revised figure of...

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