Month: May 2017

Defence review to improve deployment benefits
Front Lines

Defence review to improve deployment benefits

The federal government will no longer tax deployed military and police personnel, regardless of their mission’s risk, under changes proposed by Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan. The measure is part of the coming defence review and is retroactive to Jan. 1. It will apply to all of the approximately 1,450 personnel currently on international operations. Until now, military and police deployed on high- and moderate-risk missions were given tax relief only for the periods over which the missions maintained their risk assessment. Those serving on low-risk missions were not eligible for tax relief. Mission risk levels were graded on a point scale and those serving on them were awarded tax deductions accordingly. Now all deployed personnel will be eligible for tax exemptions, regardless of...
5 war video games where you can play as a Canadian
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5 war video games where you can play as a Canadian

Call of Duty 3 In Call of Duty 3, there is a campaign in which the player takes control of Private Cole, a member of the 4th Canadian (Armoured) Division. Call of Duty: Roads to Victory Call of Duty: Roads to Victory features an entire campaign based on Canadian exploits during the Second World War. With four levels in the campaign, the player takes control of Corporal Allan Bradshaw of the Calgary Highlanders, 1st Canadian Army, and Cpl. Todd Gessinger of the North Shore (New Brunswick) Regiment, 1st Canadian Army, to fight off Germans during Operation Infatuate in the Battle of the Scheldt. Steel Division: Normandy 44   Newly released real-time strategy game Steel Division: Normandy 44 allows the player to take control of historical units based on the div...
“You can’t regret life”
Health

“You can’t regret life”

Paul Franklin wasn’t going to let the loss of his legs change him Story and photography by Stephen J. Thorne For two years, Master Corporal Paul Franklin kept pictures on the wall of his cubicle in Land Force Western Area Headquarters at CFB Edmonton—they were photos of the Taliban fighters who took his legs. His plan was to cross each one out as they were eliminated by allied forces in Afghanistan, where Franklin, a medic, had been driving the G Wagon in which Canadian diplomat Glyn Berry was killed by a car bomb on Jan. 15, 2006. There was the Taliban’s senior military commander, Mullah Dadullah, along with a local cell commander and his deputy. They had orchestrated what Franklin is convinced was a directed hit using a suicide driver and 56 kilograms of high explosive....
7 must watch movies featuring Canada at war
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7 must watch movies featuring Canada at war

Have you ever watched a war movie and thought, "when are they going to mention Canada?" It's rare that the great white north gets anything more than a nod in cinematic depictions of warfare, but these 7 movies break the mould and let Canada take centre stage. Hyena Road (2015) Set in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan, Hyena Road follows Canadian Forces snipers as they attempt to construct a road deep in the heart of Taliban territory. The film explores the complex relationships between foreign soldiers and local civilians, while also depicting the moral grey area of modern combat. Directed by Paul Gross, Hyena Road received three Canadian Screen Awards for audio and visual effects.   Passchendaele (2008) Shot mainly in Calgary, Passchendaele depicts Sergeant Michael Dunne, of t...
Our vulnerable Arctic
Front Lines

Our vulnerable Arctic

  The Arctic’s vast expanse and stirring emptiness are rarely top of mind but always at the core of Canadians’ collective soul. It is a land of breathtaking beauty, profound challenges and stark contrasts. Nearly 40 per cent of Canadian territory lies above the Arctic Circle, yet only about one per cent of the country’s population lives there. It is believed to harbour untold mineral and petroleum wealth, yet its riches are all but untapped. We think of it as one of the last great bastions of pure nature left on Earth, so we question whether those resources should ever be exploited. Yet there is growing evidence that the once-pristine Arctic waters are becoming the world’s refuse bin. Developments, both recent and evolving, have posed a threat to Canadians’ traditional vie...
“It crushed me”
Health

“It crushed me”

Nine years ago, Mark Campbell was the high-value target of a Taliban remotely detonated bomb. Today, he says, “I lost my legs for all the right reasons.” Story and photography by Stephen J. Thorne The toughest part of Mark Campbell’s nine-year ordeal was being separated—not from his legs by a Taliban bomb, but from the uniform and the life he loved. “Wearing the uniform, for me, was my life’s calling,” says Campbell. “It’s what I did from the time I was 13, from army cadets on straight through the reserves and into the regular army.” For Campbell, who retired from the Canadian Army as a major in 2014, being part of something bigger than himself, a part of a common and greater good, of representing his country at home and abroad, became integral to his identity, central to ...

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