NEW! Canadian Military History Trivia Challenge

Day: March 1, 2017

March/April 2017 issue now available!
News

March/April 2017 issue now available!

The March/April 2017 issue of Legion Magazine is out today! Look for it on newsstands today or check your mailbox if you subscribe already! What’s inside? The battle for the ridge A century ago, Canadians fought together as one unit for the first time. Their object was Vimy Ridge, a German stronghold that had held out against French and British attacks almost since the First World War began. What the Canadians would accomplish would be seen by many as the birth of a nation. The job for me Women have always sought to participate in Canada’s military aviation history. We take a look at the pioneering women who led the way. Hush-hush heroes Few today know of the daring exploits of Canada’s wartime undercover agents. The secret flying suit A Canadian invention gave aviators ...
Heroes and Villains
Heroes And Villains

Heroes and Villains

48-year-old teacher and translator, Ingrid Loyau-Kennett was returning home by bus to Helston, Cornwall, after visiting her two children in London when she saw a blood-drenched man lying on the street. Thinking the man had been struck by a vehicle, and having taken first-aid training in her role as a Brownie leader, Loyau-Kennett raced to his side. “I took his arm to feel his pulse,” she said later. “There was blood on the pavement…and blood was pouring out of him.” Suddenly an agitated man appeared and shouted for her to get away from the injured man. “I looked up and I could see red hands, a bloodied revolver, bloodied meat cleaver and a butcher’s knife. ‘Okay,’ I thought, ‘this is bad.’” A second armed man was pacing in the background while a crowd gathered. Some people were shooting v...
Expecting cyber-attacks in Latvia
Front Lines

Expecting cyber-attacks in Latvia

While most of the 450 Canadian troops deploying to Latvia in June will be conducting traditional operations and exercises asserting their presence and fostering good relations in the Russian border republic, a cadre of specialists will be engaged in all-out warfare–cyber-warfare, that is. Overseas and in operations rooms back in Canada, they will be combatting Moscow’s efforts to win the hearts and minds of Latvians and incite growing dissent among the republic’s Russian-speaking minority. The allied counter-efforts–including their own cyber-operations, an open-door media policy and more traditional intelligence functions–will be keys to the ultimate success of the Canadian-led NATO mission. Russian propaganda efforts in Latvia are already underway, including efforts to make it ap...
The battle for the ridge
Choose our cover, Remembrance

The battle for the ridge

There is perhaps no place in France where as many men have been killed to the square yard as on this sloping ground,” recounted Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Hayes of the 85th Battalion of the Vimy Ridge battlefield. The ridge in northeastern France was a crucial high point that offered a commanding view of the surrounding countryside. In the static trench warfare of the Western Front, it offered tremendous advantages to whichever side occupied it. The German Sixth Army had swept over French forces in October 1914 and captured the seven-kilometre-long ridge. It was 145 metres above sea level at its highest point, giving the Germans long-range observation into the French soldiers’ trenches. They used their artillery to devastating effect. The French tried to retake the ridge in three major b...
Editorial

Integrating into civilian life

The House of Commons Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs released a report in December looking at services the Canadian Armed Forces and Veterans Affairs Canada provide to members being released from the military (see page 64 of March/April issue). Specifically, the report looks at these services from the point of view of veterans and their families. The committee, chaired by Liberal MP Neil Ellis, found distrust exists with VAC along with a feeling that the department has a culture of saying “no.” It suggests that much of the feeling is based on old impressions and does not take into consideration improvements made by the department. But recognizing that this is an impression, many of the report’s 18 recommendations, look at issues where trust can be improved. An important point made...
Should Canada send ground troops into Syria?
Face to Face

Should Canada send ground troops into Syria?

On its Global Affairs website, the Government of Canada describes the conflict in Syria as “the worst humanitarian crisis in the world today.” It quotes UN figures: 13.5 million people inside Syria in urgent need of help; more than a quarter-million dead, hundreds of thousands wounded; some five million-plus refugees. It’s a catastrophe that is spreading by the day. Efforts to contain it are like putting the proverbial genie back in the bottle. But, bless its big heart, Canada is trying. “To date, Canada has committed almost $1 billion in humanitarian, development and security assistance in response to the Syria crisis,” says Global Affairs. Trouble is, Canada—and the international community—are a day late and a dollar short when it comes to responsible action in Syria and elsewhere...

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An informative primer on Canada’s crucial role in the Normandy landing, June 6, 1944.