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Day: November 1, 2016

Should Remembrance Day be a statutory holiday?
Face to Face

Should Remembrance Day be a statutory holiday?

Both sides to this debate seek the same outcome: heightened awareness of, and greater public participation in, Canada’s annual Remembrance Day observances. The question hinges on the most effective means of achieving this goal. By enshrining Remembrance Day as a statutory holiday, on a par with Canada Day, the event would be nationally institutionalized, and the vast majority of Canadians would be available to participate in formal ceremonies and activities. Honouring the revered memory of those men and women who served and sacrificed, coupled with an expressed commitment to support those who continue to do so, would become ingrained as a unifying, national event. The question of whether Remembrance Day should be a national holiday has vexed the country for nearly a century. Those op...
Heroes and Villains: Obama and bin Laden
Heroes And Villains

Heroes and Villains: Obama and bin Laden

Immediately after being elected, U.S. President Barack Obama made hunting down al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden his administration’s top mission in the war on terrorism While campaigning in June 2008, Barack Obama promised to capture al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden but offered few details of any plan. The Democratic presidential candidate came under heavy fire from media pundits, who called the statement either naïve or a calculated gambit he would abandon once in the White House. Less than five months later, on Nov. 4, Obama became America’s first Black president. He immediately announced a timetable for the withdrawal of American troops in Iraq—an act that earned him the Nobel Peace Prize— and ordered a covert hunt for the architect of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks that ki...
One year later
Editorial

One year later

It has been a little over a year since the Liberal government came to power, promising a new era of openness. One of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s first actions was to release the mandate letters sent to his new ministers. These letters, usually cloaked in cabinet secrecy, outline the actions expected of the minister during the government’s first term. Veterans Affairs Minister Kent Hehr was given 14 actions to ensure veterans receive the respect, support, care and economic opportunities they deserve. These were generally welcomed by veterans advocates but, a year later, what has been done? There has been some success, to be sure. The 2016 federal budget tackled a few key points in the New Veterans Charter. One was that the Disability Award, a non-economic benefit which recognizes pai...

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