Month: July 2016

Repairs will shutter National War Memorial
News

Repairs will shutter National War Memorial

The National War Memorial in Ottawa will be closed to visitors this summer as it goes through a second phase of repairs and conservation. The Department of National Defence also announced in April that the popular National Sentry Program, which would have started on April 9, has been suspended for 2016. Public Services and Procurement Canada says it will be completing structural slab replacement, replacing damaged stonework where needed, repairing damaged areas of the cenotaph and refurbishing the bronze statues. The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier will be preserved and protected throughout the process. The tomb is a four-metre-long granite and bronze sarcophagus which contains the remains of an unknown Canadian soldier who died in the vicinity of Vimy Ridge in France. The National War M...
OSI Section of the Legion proposed
News

OSI Section of the Legion proposed

It was a significant meeting April 16-17 when the Dominion Executive Council (DEC) convened to make some decisions that will help shape the future of the organization. Grand President Larry Murray set the tone with his opening remarks. “This extended DEC prior to convention has always been an important gathering, but I believe that it’s particularly critical at this juncture in the history of the Legion. All of you and many others should be commended on the superb progress achieved in responding to the will of the 2014 convention by successfully implementing the dominion president’s deficit reduction plan. “It’s great to see the potential creation of a special operational stress injury (OSI) section within the Legion being deliberated at this DEC meeting and hopefully becoming a historic...
Our Back Pages: 1961-1979
Military History, Our Back Pages

Our Back Pages: 1961-1979

From Legionary to Legion Magazine Fourth in a six-part series looking back at 90 years of The Legionary and Legion Magazine The Legionary carried on in its large format throughout the 1960s. Articles typically addressed the issues of resettling veterans from the Second World War and the Korean War and improving disability pensions. The magazine was going through its own struggles. First came the name change. In January 1969, the editorial invited readers to ring in the new year with a new look and title which it hoped would attract more advertisers. “We think our new name, Legion, has a crisp, modern sound, in keeping with today’s brand symbols and publishing trends,” the editorial said. The new look proved popular, but a bigger storm was brewing as the federal government ...
Serving You

Serving You: July/August 2016

Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) is no longer initiating optional reviews, for example, calling veterans to periodically review assessments. Application for financial assistance can be made using a simple two-page Legion Benevolent Fund Application to confirm eligibility through a local Legion branch, provincial command or Dominion Command. Once you are in receipt of disability benefits and an assessment decision is completed for your condition, you are able to request a reassessment if you feel that the condition(s) have worsened. However, there are some timelines you must adhere to. Medical conditions are not normally reviewed if it is less than two years since your last examination. If you feel that your condition has worsened and you have new medical evidence, you can request a reass...
CBC’s Rick Mercer receives Legion’s Founders Award
News

CBC’s Rick Mercer receives Legion’s Founders Award

Story Updated: It was announced at DEC that CBC journalist and comedian Rick Mercer will become the third recipient of the Legion’s Founders Award to be presented in St. John’s. Mercer has long been a staunch supporter of Canadian soldiers and veterans, regularly travelling overseas to visit troops and in particular lending his support to the military’s ‘stigma’ project to end misconceptions of mental illness. “I am deeply moved and flattered by this recognition,” said Mercer in a statement. “The most personally satisfying aspect of my career has been the opportunity to highlight the tremendous work of the Canadian Forces at home and overseas. As a civilian I am proud to be an advocate for their well-being.” In other news at DEC, B.C./Yukon Command President Marc Tremblay gave...
A dead Canadian general, Osama bin Laden, and the world’s worst ally
Front Lines

A dead Canadian general, Osama bin Laden, and the world’s worst ally

Canada has a long history in Pakistan. It was there during one of the first United Nations peacekeeping missions—UNMOGIP or United Nations Military Observer Group India-Pakistan—that Canada lost its first peacekeeper. UNMOGIP began on Jan. 24, 1949, with a mandate to supervise the ceasefire between India and Pakistan in the State of Jammu and Kashmir. Canadian Brigadier-General Harry Angle was named as the mission’s first chief military observer. But shortly after taking his post, he died in a plane crash while travelling to Kashmir. That happened on July 17, 1950. Angle was 44. He had commanded the British Columbia Dragoons in the Italian and Netherlands campaigns during the Second World War. In the time since Angle’s death, both Canada and the United States have failed to ma...

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