Month: July 2016

On this date: August 2016
On This Date, Uncategorized

On this date: August 2016

  1 AUGUST 1959 Georges P. Vanier, Canada’s first French-speaking governor general, is appointed. 2 AUGUST 1909 The Silver Dart makes its first passenger flight, in an army evaluation at Camp Petawawa. 3 AUGUST 2006 Four soldiers of the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry are killed in a Taliban ambush.: Corporal Christopher Reid, Corporal Bryce Keller, Sergeant Vaughn Ingram, Private Kevin Dallaire. 4 AUGUST 1910 The first ship is commissioned for the Canadian navy. 5-6 AUGUST 1944 HMC Ships Haida and Iroquois and three British ships sink five and damage three German ships in the Bay of Biscay. 6 AUGUST 1945 The atomic bomb is dropped on Hiroshima, Japan. 7 AUGUST 1916 The Battle of Pozières Ridge ends. 8 AUGUST 1944 SS defenders ar...
Canada’s monument in U.S. national cemetery
News

Canada’s monument in U.S. national cemetery

When Prime Minister Justin Trudeau visited the Arlington National Cemetery while in Washington, D.C., in March, he made a stop to place a wreath at a little known Canadian monument. The Canadian Cross of Sacrifice was a gift from Canada to the United States to pay tribute to the large number of Americans who chose to fight with Canadian forces during the First World War. Since the U.S. did not enter the war until 1917, many anxious Americans came north to join Canada’s army and fight in Europe. The cross was suggested by Prime Minister Mackenzie King in 1925. U.S. President Calvin Coolidge approved the request and on Nov. 11, 1927, he unveiled the monument. The monument was designed by British architect Sir Reginald Bloomfield using the model he created for the Imperial War Graves C...
News

VAC drug programs under review

The auditor general has recommended Veterans Affairs Canada tighten up and update its drugs benefits program and policies, actions which VAC says have already begun. The auditor general examined the program for the 2013-14 and 2014-15 fiscal years, looking at evidence used to make decisions, strategies to keep costs in line, and monitoring of prescriptions. It found the department wanting on each front. In 2014-15, the drug benefits program served about 51,000 veterans at a cost of about $80 million.    A review of decisions by the committee that oversees adding or removing and tightening or broadening access found many decisions that were not supported by evidence. For instance, in 2014, the department decided to limit medical marijuana coverage to 10 grams per day, but the auditor gen...
Win a Chris Hadfield autographed edition of Aviators!
News

Win a Chris Hadfield autographed edition of Aviators!

New Subscription Contest!   From now until AUGUST 31st. When you SUBSCRIBE FOR 3 YEARS or more, you have a chance to win a FREE special collector’s edition of TWENTY-FIVE GREAT CANADIAN AVIATORS signed by CANADIAN ASTRONAUT Cmdr. Chris Hadfield. This is a certified Special Collector’s Edition signed by one of the few people in the world to leave Earth, and first Canadian Astronaut to walk in space and command the International Space Station. PROMO CODE: AVCONJ-A16 * Applies to any 3-year or more subscription or gift subscription only. The chosen entry will receive one Chris Hadfield autographed edition of Aviators. No cash value.
The militia and the coal miners’ strike
Home Front

The militia and the coal miners’ strike

In 1913, the militia was called out during a coal miners’ strike on Vancouver Island. Called the Great Strike of 1912-14, it was to be and remains the longest deployment of the militia in aid of the civil power in Canadian history. The immediate cause of this strike in Nanaimo, 110 kilometres north of Victoria, was mine safety, union recognition and the firing of a union organizer. However, attempts to resolve the issues failed. After a raucous meeting at Cumberland Hall on Sept. 15, 1912, the miners voted to strike. Canadian Collieries, the owner of the Dunsmuir mine, responded by evicting the strikers’ families from company housing, hiring “scab” labour and refusing to negotiate. The unrest spread to other mines with similar results. Over several months the confrontations grew stronger...
Governor General presents first Medal  for Volunteers
News

Governor General presents first Medal for Volunteers

A new medal for volunteers has been approved by the Queen and become part of the Canadian Honours System. Governor General David Johnston presided over the inaugural presentation of the Sovereign’s Medal for Volunteers at Rideau Hall in Ottawa on April 12. The medal incorporates and replaces the Governor General’s Caring Canadian Award which was created in 1995 by then-Governor General Romeo LeBlanc. “You represent our values and the kind of country we want to live in and that we want our kids and grandkids to live in,” said Johnston in presenting the medal to 55 recipients. Among those receiving the medal was Angus Stanfield of Sooke, B.C., who has been active in The Royal Canadian Legion, serving as president of Sooke Branch and working his way through the ranks to be president ...

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