Month: June 2015

Editorial

Editorial: May/June 2015

A flurry of announcements Hot on the heels of his January appointment as Minister of Veterans Affairs, Erin O’Toole, Member of Parliament for Durham, Ont., has made a series of announcements that appear to be aimed at fixing some of the more egregious gaps and controversies plaguing Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) and the New Veterans Charter. Just in time for a federal election call. The announcements, pending parliamentary approval, expand support for seriously disabled veterans, reservists and veterans’ families. At press time, the announcements included: a new Retirement Income Security Benefit for moderately to severely disabled veterans and their families. This would provide a monthly payment to such veterans beginning at age 65, taking over from the Earnings Loss (EL) Benefit,...
Editorial

Editorial: March/April 2015

What is free speech? “Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.” These words were enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on Dec. 10, 1948. The Declaration resulted from the events of the Second World War and is the first expression of rights to which all people are inherently entitled. Free speech is restricted by all nations, to some degree, with the test usually being whether influencing a third party’s opinions or actions adversely affects the second party. Libel, slander, obscenity, sedition, hate speech and numerous other specific a...
Editorial

Editorial: January/February 2015

With silent, steadfast resolve Wherever they gathered on Remembrance Day 2014, Canadians shared a heightened sense of resolve that again galvanized their will to never forget those who have died in the service of Canada. The horrific events in Ottawa and Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Que.,—just a few weeks before November 11th—led to a surge of expression that swelled around war memorials and cenotaphs in small towns and big cities. There was anger and sadness, but overtaking that was a tremendous amount of gratitude for Canadians who have served their country—expressed in a day that became more personal for a lot more people, even though many already have very compelling reasons to remember relatives and friends who served and died in war. Words can say a lot about how people view reme...
Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

Rev. George Beach of Port Dufferin, N.S., says this incident took place at No. 4 RAF Air Gunnery School at Walney Island in northwest England during WW II: The station warrant officer, a regular known as Little Willie throughout the RAF, was not happy with the performance of a firing party at a funeral drill. “I’ll make it more realistic,” he said. “I’ll be the corpse.” Once again, Little Willie gave the orders, then marched between the two ranks and lay down on the grass. Looking up, he said: “Now, your heads is right. Your hands is right. Your weapons is right. But you ain’t got that look of regret that you ought to have."  
Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

Ruth E. Dunnett of Thunder Bay, Ont., says that for women joining the services, one of the most difficult things to learn during basic training was tying a tie. After tying and untying my tie umpteen times, and in complete frustration, she threatened to go on parade without it. A roommate offered to help–but said Dunnett would have to lie on her back on her bunk “But why?” she asked. “Well,” the roommate replied, “my father was an undertaker and I was his helper.”    

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