Month: April 2015

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Uncle’s Song

Uncle’s Song By Dr. R. Byrnes Fleuty April 1989 ‘We would sooner f--- than fight.’ That’s Uncle’s favourite song these days. He says he doesn’t know why the song came back to him; “guess it’s just one of them things.” I arrive at his door unannounced and ring the doorbell. While I wait, I notice his lovely little red brick cottage is in need of some tender loving care. Paint is peeling off the steps and the wood is beginning to rot. I ring the bell again. A few minutes pass and the door slowly opens. There he sits, in his wheelchair, looking out the screen door at me. I tell him who I am and walk in. “Well for goodness sake,” says Uncle, as he backs his chair into the tidy living room. I notice pictures of my family taped to the bookcase beside his easy chair. I don’t ask if...
Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

Praise be, a Red Newman story from 67 years ago and from a man who was there, William Green of Cambridge, Ont., who relates: Between the battles of Vimy Ridge and Hill 70, we were out on rest in a town named Barlin where the Dumbells were playing to their usual full houses. When I saw the show, I happened to be sitting next to Canon Scott, the beloved padre of the 1st Div. Newman, one of the Dumbells troupe, spotted the padre in the audience and immediately told a story. A dying soldier in hospital asked Padre Scott to pray for him. The padre knelt beside the bed and said a long prayer. The soldier asked for another, then another. Canon Scott was finally constrained to ask why the soldier wanted so many prayers. The soldier replied: “Well, padre, your breath smells so much like h...
Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

B.M. Khokhar of Halifax, a retired Indian Army officer, sends us a story about Mahatma Gandhi. King George V was anxious to meet Gandhi and invited him to Buckingham Palace for tea. Despite the King’s strictness about court dress and protocol, Gandhi arrived in his usual loincloth, sandals, shawl and dangling watch. Afterwards, someone asked Gandhi whether he wore enough to suit the King. Gandhi replied: “The King had enough on for both of us.”    
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FRANCE: THE FIRST TIME

FRANCE: THE FIRST TIME By Hugh Laughlin April 1989   School principal Hugh Laughlin of Chilliwack, B.C., pulled no punches in letters home from the front lines during the First World War. He enlisted with the 196th (Western Universities) Battalion, formed at Winnipeg. These excerpts were culled from letters written to his brother concerning the April 9-14, 1917, attack on Vimy Ridge; they were first printed in The Chilliwack Progress in October of that year and again in April, 1988. After the war, Laughlin came home to his wife and two children and worked first as a game warden and later as a liquor salesman. He died in 1960. I wish I could go home now. I have done what I wanted to do when I enlisted. That is to feel that I had a go at the brutes who murder women and ch...
Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

Joan Kraft of Calgary says her mother was always singing and that during WW II, with three sons overseas, she kept abreast of all the popular war songs and sang them as she went about her daily chores. Shortly before she died at 86, she received a visit from an acquaintance who was a born-again Christian. Stepping over the threshold of my mother’s modest home, she intoned: “Praise the Lord.” “And pass the ammunition!” my mother belted out.    

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