Day: March 1, 2015

The aging brain—slower, but wiser
Health

The aging brain—slower, but wiser

Everybody has lapses in memory —“Where did I leave my keys?”  “What is his name?” “What’s that word I need?” But once you pass the milestone birthdays of 60 and beyond, such questions raise the worry: “Could this be the first sign of dementia?” It is wise to be watchful, as risk rises with age. But we don’t need to feel doomed or helpless. Research is showing that although there are changes in structure and function, healthy older brains function well—albeit a little slower. Research also shows we can take action to improve memory and cognition as we age. And as a result of research, more and better treatments are being devised to lower the risk of developing dementia, delay its onset and maintain more function as it progresses. One in 13 Canadians aged 65 to 74 years old is a...
Redefining ‘combat’
Defence Today, Front Lines

Redefining ‘combat’

In news from Canada’s shooting war, it turns out that the mission to advise and assist Kurdish forces in northern Iraq had a much more rigorous amount of assisting involved than was initially made clear. In a press conference in Ottawa on Jan. 19, Lieutenant-General Jonathan Vance, head of the Joint Operations Command, and Brigadier-General Michael Rouleau, head of Special Operations Forces Command, told reporters that not only had Canadian special operations snipers directly engaged ISIL militants, but that the Canadian soldiers had been calling in airstrikes since November—no fewer than 13 times. While close observers have noted that the war against ISIL has been following the model of the successful 2001 campaign against the Taliban, which was to use coalition airpower guided by speci...
On This Date: March 2015
Military History, On This Date

On This Date: March 2015

MARCH 1, 1942 The Canadian Women’s Army Corps is granted full army status and becomes an integral part of the Canadian Militia. Prior to this, only nursing sisters were admitted into the Canadian Armed Forces. MARCH 2, 1923 The Halibut Treaty, a Canadian-American agreement concerning fishing rights in the North Pacific Ocean, is the first treaty negotiated and signed by Canada independent of Britain. MARCH 3, 1919 William E. Boeing and Eddie Hubbard use Boeing’s C-700 to deliver the first Canadian international airmail from Vancouver, B.C., to Seattle, Wash. MARCH 4, 2006 In Gumbad, Afghanistan, while meeting with village elders, Canadian Captain Trevor Greene is attacked from behind by a man wielding an axe and suffers a serious head wound. MARCH 5, 1885 Louis...
Travelling About: March/April 2015
Canada Corner, Travelling About

Travelling About: March/April 2015

1. Visit Quebec’s Citadel for a special exhibition The Parallel is a special exhibition of photography that compares the First World War to the mission in Afghanistan. This series of pictures taken on the battlefields of Europe and Afghanistan show some uncanny similarities between the conflicts and underlines the historical, technological and human connections between these two periods. The exhibition also showcases five pairs of objects used by soldiers during the First World War and during the Afghanistan mission. The Citadelle March 1–May 9 Quebec City www.lacitadelle.qc.ca 2. Visit Alberta for an exhibition featuring Iranian photography The Military Museums in Calgary is hosting a special exhibition of Iranian photography this spring. The Burnt Generation is a collection of p...
The Forgotten Front
Army, Military History

The Forgotten Front

Canadians fought continuously on Sicily and the Italian mainland from July 1943 to February 1945, losing more than 5,000 men. Why then is the Italian Campaign so overlooked today?   In May 1943, the British and Americans had finally liberated North Africa by defeating Germany’s Afrika Korps. But where would the Allies strike next? The Americans had wanted to invade France in 1942 and still had hopes for an early assault, but the British remained wary. Could Italy be next? In the “soft underbelly” of Europe, as Prime Minister Winston Churchill called it, the Fascist regime of Benito Mussolini was war-weary, and an invasion of Sicily might bring Il Duce (the leader) to the ground. The British hope was to force the Germans to deploy in strength in Italy, thus weakening their campaig...

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