Month: February 2015

Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

Bernard McElwaine of Finchley, London, England, says he served four years with the North Shore (N.B.) Regt. About 30 per cent of the regiment was French speaking, though all commands were in English. One day a French-speaking sergeant was marching a company back to billets in Boscombe, a Bournemouth suburb, when they approached barbed wire on the seacliff. The English command “Mark time” completely deserted the sergeant, but suddenly, inspired, he barked: “Left right, left right, but don’t go anywhere.” Everybody smartly marked time.
News

One third of veterans surveyed feel “poorly served” by Veterans Affairs Canada

NEWS RELEASE: Feb. 25, 2015 One third of veterans surveyed feel “poorly served” by Veterans Affairs Canada Legion Magazine has stepped in to fill a gap left by the federal department of Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC), which has discontinued its national survey measuring the satisfaction of military veterans with the services they receive from VAC. The department is responsible for veterans’ care, treatment and re-establishment in civil life. Results from Legion Magazine’s second annual Veterans Benefits Survey have been published at www.legionmagazine.com and in the March/April 2015 issue of Legion Magazine. Almost 85 percent of the 449 respondents receive VAC benefits. More than one third of respondents felt that Canadian veterans are “poorly served” by VAC, and almost half o...
Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

We received this from John Craig of Thorold, Ont.: During basic training with an infantry regiment, a tall, thin, university student passed all the written examinations with ease. But rifle drill and arduous physical training were beyond his capabilities. When the course ended, the sergeant instructor announced that this student was going to officers’ training school because of his university background and added: “I am sure you will make a fine officer, because you’ll never be a soldier.”      

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