Month: August 2014

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“Dead” Man Appears to Old Comrade

  “Dead” Man Appears to Old Comrade By The Legionary June 15th, 1926 “Hello, Jack!” “My God, Tom, I buried you in France – thought you were dead!” “Not me, Jack; this is me here.” And Guard John Reid at the Jail Farm, Langstaff, Ont., walking into the refectory for duty at dinner hour, a few days ago renewed his wartime friendship with Thomas Armstrong, a comrade he has been mourning since the sad day following the battle of St. Julien in the fateful spring of 1915. On that day of sad memories to many Canadian homes, Provost-Sergeant John Reid, of the Ontario Fourth Battalion, was among those whose sorrowful duty it was to give burial to fallen comrades. The party came across an unrecognizable figure without any means of identification, but close by was ...
Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

Jack Wallace of Ottawa says that while digging around in the Public Archives of Canada he found that the Canadian Army was responsible for an unannounced exploit: the wide dissemination of pork and beans. The Canadian Corps war diary of July, 1916, recorded the great event: “This ration (one pound of tinned pork and beans to three men, four times a week) is issued to the whole army in France on a recommendation originally made by the Canadian Corps.” A week later, the corps diarist noted that all Allied corps and divisions had found the rations a “highly satisfactory” addition to the regular diet. The British armies, indeed, wanted it increased to one pound for two men.  
Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

B.E. Smith of London, Ont., says this incident occurred in HMCS Nootka: A sailor complained that the liver was rotten. The doctor, summoned as judge, pronounced it good. At the next serving of liver, there were several complaints. “Awful offal,” they called it. The doctor, now uncertain, banned further use pending the opinion of a professional meat inspector. During a stop at Bermuda, a sample of liver was sent to His Majesty’s victualling depot for testing. The report, delivered before the ship sailed next morning, declared the liver to be “pure and wholesome.” No one could doubt His Majesty, of course, and the remaining liver was eaten without great griping. Months later, on another Nootka visit to Bermuda, the meat inspector was asked what tests he had applied. “I ate...
Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

Here`s a Korean War story, from George McElroy of Oakville, Ont.: It was the farewell parade for 2 Royal Canadian Regiment at Camp Petawawa. After the 1st and 2nd battalions of the regiment had presented arms to each other, Lieutenant-Colonel Bingham, commanding officer of the 1st, shouted: “Three cheers for Col. Keane and his Royal Canadians!” The 1st doffed caps and gave three resounding cheers. Lt.-Col. Keane, CO of the 2nd, then shouted: “Three cheers for Col. Bingham and his Royal Canadians!” The 2nd cheered lustily. Suddenly, a high-pitched voice somewhere among the 1st Bn. sang out: “Three cheers for Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians!” As far as McElroy knows, Col. Bingham never found the owner of that voice.      
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The Cuxhaven Raid: A Recollection of the Early Days of Britain’s Fighting Force of the Air

  The Cuxhaven Raid A Recollection of the Early Days of Britain’s Fighting Force of the Air By The Legionary February 1st, 1927 During the early part of the war the chief duty of the Harwich Force was to scout in the German Bight, in order to give notice of any movement of the enemy’s surface craft. Many were the incursions into the Bight, and all without result. Towards the end of November, 1914, a plan was evolved at the Admiralty to make a determined assault on the Cuxhaven aerodromes by means of seaplanes, and by this means possibly to bring on a meeting between the two fleets. This affair, known as the Cuxhaven Raid, was planned to take place on 22nd November, 1914, but after an abortive attempt, of which more hereafter, it did not actually take place until...
Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

John Richardson of Calgary tells us of a sergeant majorly order that, he says, was meant in all seriousness. It was at the 1st Commonwealth Division’s Korean War battle school at Hara Mura, Japan, in 1953, where Richardson, after a tour with 1 Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, was an instructor. Sugar Co. was on parade and the company sergeant-major (CSM) was checking on haircuts and scrutinizing backs. “Digger, do you know you`ve got an oil spot on the back of your shirt?” the CSM barked. “Naow, sir,” said the Australian. “Well get around here on the double and look for yourself,” the CSM shouted.    

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