NEW! Canadian Military History Trivia Challenge

Day: July 1, 2014

Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

Legionnaire David Sim was wounded at Passchendaele at age 17 and became a deputy minister in the Department of National Revenue in 1930 at 30, the youngest ever appointed to that rank in the federal civil service. Sim has always been a passionate believer in common sense, which may make him a radical, and perhaps unique, in Canadian government service. He once recounted: “One day in the ‘30s I got a letter from a teacher in a Saskatchewan country school telling me that the Mounties had gone out to this farm and shot the family horse right in front of the children and what was I going to do about it. Well, I looked up the file and the teacher was right. This is what had happened: Old Ned and a buggy were the only transportation this family had. The farmer had a still on the farm a...
The World Goes Over The Edge
Military History, Our Veterans

The World Goes Over The Edge

Exclusive Audio Edition: August 2014 marks the centenary of the outbreak of a terrible conflict whose effects remain with us today. It is ironic that the century preceding the outbreak of war in 1914 was one of most peaceful in world history and in that year many people—particularly Canadians—believed that the 20th century would be a time of peace, plenty and progress. Instead, it was one of the most violent periods in recorded history: a time when the world went over the edge. “Some damned foolish thing in the Balkans.” HOW IT BEGAN The origins of the First World War can be traced back to the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-1871. That conflict not only led to the creation of a new German Reich incorporating the many independent German states into a powerful nation, it also left F...
Health

Health File: The Liver Is Really A Miraculous Organ

The liver is really a miraculous organ, performing more than 500 functions necessary to life. It rids our bodies of toxins, regulates hormones, breaks down nutrients and stores energy, metabolizes alcohol and medications, among many other things. It is also the body’s fat factory and warehouse. When we take in more calories than we expend, the excess is stored as fat, an energy source in case, pardon the pun, times are lean. But in Canada times are rarely lean anymore, and many of us regularly take in more calories than we expend. The resulting weight gain slowly becomes obvious in fat buildup in hips, thighs and belly, but a not-so-obvious buildup simultaneously occurs in the liver. When between five and 10 per cent of the liver’s weight is fat, the result is fatty liver disease,...
Travelling About: July/August 2014 Things To Do And See
Travelling About

Travelling About: July/August 2014 Things To Do And See

1. Mark The First World War Centenary At The Canadian War Museum Starting this summer, the Canadian War Museum will have a series of special exhibitions dedicated to the 100-year anniversary of the First World War. Among the first of those exhibitions is Ordinary Canadians In Extraordinary Times, consisting of 14 wartime sculptures portraying ordinary Canadians touched by the extraordinary circumstances of the First World War, a number of which have not been exhibited since the war’s end. Ordinary Canadians In Extraordinary Times Late July to February 2017 Canadian War Museum, Ottawa warmuseum.ca 2. Travel To The East Coast For A Military Extravaganza One of Canada’s largest annual military events, The Royal Nova Scotia International Tattoo is a week-long festival held every year ...
Face To Face: Was The Battle Of The Somme Worth It?
Face to Face

Face To Face: Was The Battle Of The Somme Worth It?

The Battle of the Somme was one of the most horrific battles of the First World War. Hundreds of thousands of lives were lost between July and November 1916. Was it worth it?   Author Jonathan Vance says NO. Author Andrew Iarocci says YES. Vance is a professor of history at Western University in London, Ont. He is the author of several articles and books, including Death So Noble: Memory, Meaning and the First World War and Maple Leaf Empire: Canada, Britain and Two World Wars. Iarocci is an assistant professor of history at Western University and author of Shoestring Soldiers: The First Canadian Division, 1914-15 and co-editor of Vimy Ridge: A Canadian Reassessment. His current research interests include military transportation and procurement. JONATHAN VANCE NO While Fie...

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An informative primer on Canada’s crucial role in the Normandy landing, June 6, 1944.