Month: June 2014

Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

John D. Kenney of Windsor, Ont., reminds us indirectly that recipients gave all kinds of outlandish reasons for being awarded the Canadian Volunteer Service Medal. He quotes a chief petty officer of his motor torpedo boat as telling a Yank in a pub on the south coast of England that he got for smoking rationed cigarettes for six months without coughing.”
Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

Hugh Baird of Oshawa, Ont., sent a story about a pensioner who walked into the local and asked for a pint of 1914 ale. The barman was puzzled and asked the manager what he should do. “That’s all right,” said the manager, “just give him a pint of what you’ve got on tap.” The barkeeper did so. “Thanks,” said the pensioner, putting a nickel on the counter, “I didn’t think you’d have any left.”    
Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

First World War veteran Herb Stonham of Dunnville, Ont., recalled this incident at Camp Borden in 1916 when his unit was preparing for embarkation leave:    "We were all on our best behavior except for Private Williams who somehow landed himself six days at Confined to Barracks at the last minute. Two days later, we were on the train on the way to our various homes and feeling sorry for our friend, when who should walk down the aisle of the train but Pte. Williams. He was very jaunty but we knew he’d be in deeper trouble when he returned. When we reported back, he immediately paraded before the commanding officer. “Well, soldier, have you any explanation for breaking out of camp when you were confined to barracks?” “Yes, sir,” said Pte. Williams. “Ever since I joined up, everybod...
Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

Daisy Cook, 90, of Regina sends this: A young padre, visiting a hospital ward for the first time, asked for a list of patients. Beside 20 names were the initials RC; beside two, the initial P. “How is it there are so many Roman Catholics?” he asked. “That’s the breakfast list, 20 for Rice Crispies and two for porridge,” a nurse replied.        
Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

Campbell C. King of White Rock, B.C., a member of the Great War Veterans’ Association and Legion for 63 years, recounts: An Anzac outfit was in line next to the 44th Manitoba Battalion and a badly-wounded Canadian soldier was brought unconscious into a tented-off corner of an Australian advance dressing station where an Aussie nurse was in charge. The Canadian came to, looked around and said: “Did they bring me in here to die?” “Oh, no,” the nurse said. “They brought you in yesterdie.”      
Humour Hunt

Humour Hunt

Here’s a sign story from John Edlund of Cobble Hill, B.C. “Among the prominent posters displayed in Britain during the war was one saying ‘FOOD WILL WIN THE WAR.’ “My chum and I got off the tube in London one day and someone had printed over this poster in huge block letters: ‘YES, BUT HOW ARE YOU GOING TO GET THE ENEMY TO EAT IT?’ ”    

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